Bibliography
Of Swift by J.M. Murry

Place of publication London, unless stated otherwise. Detailed bibliographical information will also be found in the appropriate volume of The Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature and The Oxford History of English Literature.

A Select Bibliography
Collected Works
Selected Works
Letters
Separate Works
Biography And Criticism
« START » « Swift » « Biographies » « Library »

A Select Bibliography

A Bibliography OF THE WRITINGS IN PROSE AND VERSE, by H. Teerink; The Hague (1937)—revised edition, edited by A. H. Scouten, Philadelphia, 1963. This is a comprehensive work, superseding W. S. Jackson's Bibliography (Vol. XII of Prose Works, ed. T. Scott, 1908) and containing extensive lists of doubtful and supposititious writings as well as of critical and biographical studies.

CONTRIBUTIONS TOWARDS A BIBLIOGRAPHY OF GULLIVER'S TRAVELS, by L. L. Hubbard (1922).

THE MOTTE EDITIONS OF GULLIVER'S TRAVELS' by H. Williams (1925) —see also Sir H. Williams's authoritative bibliography of the early editions in his edition of Gulliver's Travels (First Edition Club, 1926) .

THE REPUTATION OF SWIFT, 1781-1882, by D. M. Berwick; Philadelphia (1941)

JONATHAN SWIFT A List of Critical Studies, 1895-1945, compiled by L. A. Landa andJ. E. Tobin; New York (1945) —a valuable guide to numerous articles in learned journals, with an account of Swift MSS in American libraries, by D. H. Davis.

THE ROTHSCHILD LIBRARY, 2 vols (1954) —contains full descriptions of the important collection of printed books, pamphlets and manuscripts by Swift formed by Lord Rothschild, with references to bibliographical studies of separate works published since Teerink.


Collected Works

MISCELLANIES IN PROSE AND VERSE (1715) —apart from a 16 page pamphlet (1710), the earliest collection of Swift's writings. A number of unauthorized and pirated Swiftian 'Miscellanies' of varied content were published during the following quarter of a century.

MISCELLANIES IN PROSE AND VERSE, 3 vols (1727) —these first three volumes of the 'Swift-Pope Miscellanies' were extended by a fourth volume ('The Third Volume') in 1732 and a fifth in 1735. An edition in 6 volumes, containing some variations appeared in 1736. This famous collection was from the first frequently reprinted and re-issued in various combinations of editions and dates. By 1751 it had been extended to 13 volumes.

THE DRAPIER'S MISCELLANY; Dublin (1733)—miscellaneous pieces in verse and prose relating to the Irish economy.

WORKS, 4 vols; Dublin (1735) —published by Faulkner, with Swift's tacit approval, this textually important edition was extended to 6 volumes in 1738, to 8 volumes in 1746, to 11 volumes in 1763, and by 1769 to 20 volumes (with the Letters). Sets of the reprinted volumes of various dates are found in irregular combinations.

POETICAL WORKS; Dublin (1736)—a separate reprint of Vol. II of Faulkner's second edition of the Works. A number of separate editions of Swift's poetical works were published during the eighteenth century and his poems were included in the well-known series edited by Bell, Johnson, Anderson, Park, etc.

WORKS, ed. J. Hawkesworth, 6 or 12 vols (1755-75)—a rival of Faulkner's edition, published simultaneously in 6 volumes 4 to and 12 volumes 8vo, 1755, subsequently extended by 8 additional 4to volumes and 13 additional 8vo volumes. Also published later in 27 volumes 18mo.

WORKS, ed. T. Sheridan, 17 vols (1784) —based on Hawkesworth's text.

WORKS, 19 vols (1801: 24 vols (12mo) 1803) —Sheridan's edition 'corrected and revised' by J. Nichols.

WORKS, ed. sir W. Scott, 19 vols; Edinburgh (1814: 2nd ed. 1824; reprinted 1883) —Vol. I contains Scott's long biographical essay.

PROSE WORKS, ed, T. Scott, I2 vols (1817-1908) —Vol XII is a Bibliography by W. S. Jackson.

THE DRAPIER'S LETTERS TO THE PEOPLE OF IRELAND AGAINST RECEIVING WOOD'S HALFPENCE, ed. H. Davis; Oxford (1935) —the definitive edition.

PROSE WORKS, ed. H. Davis, 15 vols; Oxford (1939-64) —the definitive 'Shakespeare Head' edition, with valuable introductions and bibliographical and textual notes.

POEMS, ed. H. Williams, 3 vols; Oxford (1937) —the definitive edition; second edition, revised, 1958.

COLLECTED POEMS, ed. J. Horrell, 2 vols (1958)—in the Muses' Library.


Selected Works

Among the many selections from Swift's writings, ranging from school texts to limited editions-deluxe and including volumes in such series as Everyman's Library, Collins's Classics etc., the following are noteworthy: Satires and Personal Writings (ed. W. A. Eddy), 1932; Gulliver's Travels and Selected Prose and Verse (Nonesuch Press, ed. J. Hayward), 1934; Selected Prose Works (Cresset Library, ed.J. Hayward), 1949.


Letters

LETTERS TO AND FROM DR J. SWIFT, 1714-1738; Dublin (1741)—also published as Vol. VII of Faulkner's edition of Works.

LETTERS, ed. J. Hawkesworth (1766).

LETTERS, ed. J. Hawkesworth and D. Swift, 6 vols (1768-9)—published as part of Hawkesworth's edition of Works.

UNPUBLISHED LETTERS, ed. G. B. Hill (1899).

VANESSA AND HER CORRESPONDENCE WITH SWIFT, ed. A. M. Freeman (1921)—the first publication of the 'love letters' of Swift and Esther Vanhomrigh.

LETTERS TO CHARLES FORD, ed. D. Nichol Smith; Oxford (1935)—edited for the first time from the originals, now for the most part in the Rothschild Library.

THE JOURNAL TO STELLA, ed. H. Williams, 2 vols; Oxford (1948)—the definitive edition. The letters to Esther Johnson, comprising the so-called 'Journal to Stella', were first printed, more or less inaccurately, in Hawkesworth's Works, Vol. X, 1766 (Letters I and 41-65) and in Vol. XII, 1768 (Letters 2-40). Later editions: ed. G. A. Aitken, 1901; ed. F. Ryland (Vol. II of T. Scott's edition of Works, 1905);ed. J. K. Moorhead, 19z4 (Everyman's Library).


Separate Works

Note: This section does not include single pieces printed as broadsides or as folio half-sheets; contributions to periodicals (e.g. The Tatler, The Examiner), and to books by other writers, for which see Prose Works, ed. H. Davis, and Poems, ed. H. Williams; or any of the numerous doubtful or supposititious works which at various times have been ascribed to Swift. (For the titles of the latter, see Teerink's Bibliography and the excellent short-title list by H. Williams in CBEL)

A DISCOURSE OF THE CONTESTS AND DISSENSIONS BETWEEN THE NOBLES AND THE COMMONS IN ATHENS AND ROME (1701). Politics

A TALE OF A TUB [AND THE BATTLE OF THE BOOKS] (1704). Polemical Satire — annotated edition, with plates, 1710. The Battle of the Books was Swift's contribution to the famous Quarrel of the Ancients and the Moderns. The. definitive edition of both works was edited by A. Guthkelch and D. Nichol Smith, Oxford, 1920.

PREDICTIONS FOR THE YEAR 1708 (1708). Parody —the first of several jesting satires against almanac-makers (and one, Partridge, in particular), written under the pseudonym of Isaac Bickerstaff during 1708-9.

A PROJECT FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF RELIGION AND THE REFORMATION OF MANNERS (1709). Moral Instruction

A LETTER . . . CONCERNING THE SACRAMENTAL TEST (1709). Church Politics

BAUCIS AND PHILEMON (1709). Verse —Swift's first separately printed poem. Reprinted with other poems and with the prose parody, A Meditation upon a Broom-Stick, in 1710

THE EXAMINER. (1710-11). Political Journalism—32 weekly issues, beginning with No. 14, 26 Oct 1710, were written by Swift.

A SHORT CHARACTER OF . . . [THE EARL OF WHARTON] (1711). Invective

SOME REMARKS UPON A PAMPHLET (1711). Politics

A NEW JOURNEY TO PARIS (1711). Politics

A LEARNED COMMENT UPON DR HARE'S EXCELLENT SERMON (1711). Church Politics

THE CONDUCT OF THE ALLIES (1712[1711]). Politics—the definitive edition was edited, with introduction and notes, by C. B. Wheeler, Oxford, 1916.

SOME ADVICE HUMBLY OFFER'D TO THE MEMBERS OF THE OCTOBER CLUB (1712), Politics

SOME REMARKS ON THE BARRIER Treaty(1712). Politics

A PROPOSAL FOR CORRECTING . . . THE ENGLISH TONGUE (1712). Criticism

SOME REASONS TO PROVE THAT NO PERSON IS OBLIGED BY HIS PRINCIPLES AS A WHIG, ETC. (1712). Politics

A LETTER OF THANKS . . . TO THE . . . BISHOP OF S. ASAPH (1712). Church Politics

ME. COLLIN'S DISCOURSE OF FREE-THINKING (1713). Polemics

PART OF THE SEVENTH EPISTLE OF THE FIRST BOOK OF HORACE IMITATED (1713)- Verse

THE IMPORTANCE OF THE GUARDIAN CONSIDERED (1713). Politics

THE FIRST ODE OF THE SECOND BOOK OF HORACE PARAPHRAS'D (171[4]). Verse

THE PUBLICK SPIRIT OF THE WHIGS (1714). Politics

AN ARGUMENT TO PROVE THAT THE ABOLISHING OF CHRISTIANITY IN ENGLAND, ETC. (1717) —first published in the Miscellanies, 1711.

A PROPOSAL FOR THE UNIVERSAL USE OF IRISH MANUFACTURE (1720). Political Economy —A Defence of English Commodities, 1720, an answer to this pamphlet, was probably written by Swift.

A LETTER . . . TO A GENTLEMAN DESIGNING FOR HOLY ORDERS (1720). Criticism

THE SWEARER'S BANK (1720). Satire

THE BUBBLE (1721). Verse

A LETTER OF ADVICE TO A YOUNG POET; Dublin (1721). Criticism —long ascribed to Swift but probably not by him.

SOME ARGUMENTS AGAINST ENLARGING THE POWER OF THE BISHOPS (1723). Church Politics

A LETTER TO THE SHOP-KEEPERS (1724). Political Economy —the first of the celebrated 'Drapier's Letters.'

A LETTER TO MR HARDING THE PRINTER (1724). Political Economy —the second of the 'Drapier's Letters'.

SOME OBSERVATIONS UPON A PAPER (1724). Political Economy—the third of the 'Drapier's Letters'.

A LETTER TO THE WHOLE PEOPLE of IRELAND (1724). Political Economy —the fourth of the 'Drapier's Letters'.

A LETTER TO . . . VISCOUNT MOLESWORTH (1724). Political Economy—the fifth and last of the 'Drapier's Letters'. They were published together in Dublin in 1725 as Fraud Detected: or, the Hibernian Patriot. The definitive edition of the Drapier's Letters was edited by H. Davis; Oxford, 1935.

THE BERTH OF MANLY VIRTUE (1725). Verse

CADENUS AND VANESSA: A Poem (1726). Verse

[GULLIVER'S] TRAVELS ONTO SEVERAL REMOTE NATIONS OF THE WORLD, 2 vols (1726). Satirical Fantasy—Faulkner's text (Works, 1735, Vol. 111), which was revised with Swift's co-operation was first reprinted in modern times in the 'Nonesuch' Swift, and later in the Cresset Library Swift, in the 'Shakespeare Head' Swift (Vol. Xl), and in Collin's Classics. The definitive edition of the text of the first edition of 1726 was elaborately edited by H. Williams for the First Edition Club in 1926.

A SHORT VIEW OF THE STATE OF IRELAND; Dublin (1727-8). Political Economy

AN ANSWER TO A PAPER CALLED A MEMORIAL OF THE POOR INHABITANTS; Dublin (1728). Political Economy

THE INTELLIGENCER; Dublin (1728). Political Journalism —20 weekly numbers by Swift and Sheridan. Published as a volume in 1729. No. 19 was printed separately in 1736 as A Letter . . . to a Country Gentleman in the North of Ireland.

A MODEST PROPOSAL; Dublin 1729). Sociological Satire

THE JOURNAL OF A DUBLIN LADY; Dublin (1729). Verse —reprinted in London as The Journal of a Modern Lady.

A PANEGYRIC ON . . . DEAN SWIFT; Dublin (1729-30). Verse

AN EPISTLE TO . . . LORD CARTERET; Dublin (1730). Politics

AN EPISTLE UPON AN EPISTLE; Dublin (1730). Verse

A LIBEL ON D[OCTOR] D[ELANY] (1730). Verse

A VINDICATION OF . . . LORD CARTERET (1730). Politics

TRAULUS [Two parts, Dublin] (1730). Verse

HORACE, BOOK I: ODE XIV [Dublin] ([17]30). Verse

A SOLDIER AND A SCHOLAR (1732). Verse —reprinted (Dublin, 1732) as The Grand Question Debated

CONSIDERATIONS UPON TWO BILLS (1732). Church Politics

AN EXAMINATION OF CERTAIN ABUSES; Dublin (1732). Sociological Satire —the title of the London edition (1732) begins: City Cries, Instrumental and Vocal.

THE LADY'S DRESSING ROOM (1732). Verse

THE ADVANTAGES PROPOSED BY REPEALING THE SACRAMENTAL TEST-Dublin (1732). Church Politics

AN ELEGY ON DICKY AND DOLLY; Dublin (1732). Verse

THE LIFE AND GENUINE CHARACTER OF DOCTOR SWIFT. WRITTEN BY HIMSELF (1733)- Verse

ON POETRY: A Rapsody (1733). Verse

THE PRESBYTERIANS PLEA OF MERIT; Dublin (1733). Church Politics

SOME REASONS AGAINST THE BILL FOR SETTLING THE TYTH OF HEMP BY A MODUS; Dublin (1734). Political Economy

AN EPISTLE TO A LADY . . . ALSO A POEM . . . CALLED THE UNIVERSAL PASSION (1734)- Verse

A BEAUTIFUL YOUNG NYMPH GOING TO BED (1734). Verse —also contains 'Strephon and Chloe' and 'Cassinus and Peter'.

A PROPOSAL FOR GIVING BADGES TO THE BEGGARS . . . OF DUBLIN; Dublin (1737)- Sociology

AN IMITATION OF THE SIXTH SATIRE OF THE SECOND BOOK OF HORACE (1738)- Verse—written in 1714 and completed by Pope.

THE BEASTS CONFESSION TO THE PRIEST; Dublin (1738). Verse

A COMPLETE COLLECTION OF GENTEEL AND INGENIOUS CONVERSATION (1738). Social Satire—published under the pseudonym of Simon Wagstaff.

VERSES ON THE DEATH OF DR SWIFT. WRITTEN BY HIMSELF (1739). Verse —incorporates part of The Life and Genuine Character (1733). The text of the 4 folio editions of 1739, published by Bathurst in London, is inferior to the text of the 6 octavo editions published in Dublin by Faulkner in the same year.

SOME FREE THOUGHTS UPON THE PRESENT STATE OF AFFAIRS; Dublin (1741). Politics

THREE SERMONS (1744). Theology —a fourth sermon was added to the second edition of the same year.

DIRECTIONS TO SERVANTS; Dublin (1745). Social Satire

BROTHERLY LOVE: A Sermon; Dublin (1754). Theology

THE HISTORY OF THE FOUR LAST YEARS OF THE QUEEN (1758). History


Biography And Criticism

MEMOIRS [OF LAETITIA PILKINGTON], 3 vols (1748—54) —lively but somewhat fanciful first-hand reminiscences.

REMARKS ON THE LIFE AND WRITINGS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, by John Earl of Orrery (1752) —see also P. Delany's more important Observations on Lord Orrery's Remarks, 1754.

LIFE OF DR SWIFT, by J. Hawkesworth; Dublin (1755)—first printed in Vol. I of Hawkesworth's edition of Swift's Works.

AN ESSAY UPON THE LIFE, WRITINGS AND CHARACTER OF DR JONATHAN SWIFT, by D. Swift (1735)—by Swift's cousin, Deane Swift.

LIFE, by W. H. Dilworth (1758).

LIFE, by S. Johnson [in Lives of the Poets, Vol.III] (1781).

LIFE, by T. Sheridan (1784).

ESSAY ON THE EARLIER PART OF THE LIFE OF SWIFT, by J. Barrett (1808).

MEMOIRS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, by Sir W. Scott, 2 VOLS; Paris (1826) —first printed in Vol. I of Scott's edition of Works, 1814.

THE CLOSING YEARS OF DEAN SWIFT'S LIFE, by Sir W. Wilde (1849).

THE ENGLISH HUMOURISTS OF THE 18TH CENTURY, by W M.Thackeray (1851) —contains a famous essay on Swift.

JONATHAN SWIFT: Sa vie et ses oeuvres, by L. Prevost-Paradol; Paris (1856).

LIFE, by J. Forster (1875) —only Vol. I was published. The Forster Collection in the Library of the Victoria and Albert Museum, London, contains important manuscript and printed material by and relating to Swift.

SWIFT, by L. Stephen (1882) —in the 'English Men of Letters' series.

LIFE, by H. Craig (1882: 2 vols, 1894).

JONATHAN SWIFT: A Biographical and Critical Study, by J. C. Collins (1893).

DEAN SWIFT AND HIS WRITINGS, by G P. Moriarty (1893).

SWIFT IN IRELAND, by R. A. King (1895).

THE ORRERY PAPERS, 2 vols (1903).

SWIFT, by C. Whibley (1917)

The Leslie Stephen lecture, 1917.

GULLIVER'S TRAVELS: A Critical Study, by W. A. Eddy; Princeton (1923).

SWIFT EN FRANCE, by S. Goulding; Paris (1924). SWIFT: Les annees de jeunesse et 'Le Conte du Tonneau', by E. Pons; Strasbourg (1925) —the first instalment of a massive but uncompleted critical biography.

SWIFT'S VERSE, by F. E. Ball (1928).

THE SKULL OF SWIFT, by S. Leslie (1928).

DO WHAT YOU WILL, by A. Huxley (1929) —contains an essay on Swift.

SWIFT, by C. Van Doren (1931).

DEAN SWIFT'S LIBRARY, by H. Williams(1932)—contains a facsimile of the catalogue of Swift's Library.

THE LIFE AND FRIENDSHIPS OF DEAN SWIFT, by S. Gwynn (1933) —a popular biography.

JONATHAN SWIFT: A Critical Essay, by W. D. Taylor (1933).

THE SCRIPT OF JONATHAN SWIFT AND OTHER ESSAYS, by S. Leslie; Philadelphia (1935).

LA PENSEE RELIGEUSE DE SWIFT ET SES ANTINOMIES, by C. Looten; Lille (1935).

THE MIND AND ART OF JONATHAN SWIFT, by R. Quintana (1936) —an important critical study. Revised edition, 1953.

SWIFT'S MARRIAGE TO STELLA, by M.B. Gold; Cambridge, Mass. (1937) —a careful analysis of all the available evidence relating to this vexed problem.

JONATHAN SWIFT, by B. Newman (1937).

FROM ANNE TO VICTORIA, edited by B. Dobree (1937) —valuable essay on Swift by J. Hayward.

JONATHAN SWIFT, DEAN AND PASTOR, by R. W. Jackson (1939).

STELLA, by H. Davis; New York (1942).

SWIFT AND HIS CIRCLE, by R. W. Jackson; Dublin (1945).

JONATHAN SWIFT: A List of critical studies Published from 1895 to 1945, by L. A. Lands and J. E. Tobin; New York (1945).

FOUR ESSAYS ON GULLIVER'S TRAVELS, by A.E. Case; Princeton (1945) —defends the 1726 text against Faulkener's revised text of 1735.

THE SATIRE OF JONATHAN SWIFT, by H. Davis; New York (1947).

SHOOTING AN ELEPHANT, by G. Orwell (1950) —includes an essay on Gulliver.

SWIFT'S SATIRE ON LEARNING IN A TALE OF A TUB, by M.K. Starman; Princeton (1952).

THE COMMON PURSUIT, by F. R. Leavis (1952) —contains an important study, entitled 'Swift's Irony'.

THE TEXT OF GULLIVER'S TRAVELS, by H. Williams (1953) the Sanders Lecture, 1953. A defence of Faulkner's text of 1735.

JONATHAN SWIFT AND THE ANATOMY OF SATIRE: A Study of Satirical Technique, by J. M. Bullie; Harvard (1953).

JONATHAN SWIFT: A Critical Biography, by J. M. Murry (1954).

THE MASKS OF JONATHAN SWIFT, by W. M. Eward jr. (1954) —a study of the personae adopted by Swift.

SWIFT AND THE CHURCH OF IRELAND, by L. A. Landa (1954) — an important piece of research.

SWIFT: An Introduction, by R. Quintana; Oxford (1955) — Paperback edition, 1962. A masterly condensation.

SWIFT AND CARROLL, by P. Greenacre; New York (1955) — a psychological study according to Freudian principle.

THE PEN AND THE SWORD, by M. M. Foot (1957).

THE PERSONALITY OF JONATHAN SWIFT, by I. Ehrenpreis (1958).

IN SEARCH OF SWIFT, by D. Johnston; Dublin (1959).

JONATHAN SWIFT AND THE AGE OF COMPROMISE, by E. Millions (1959).

DEAN SWIFT, by D. F. R. Wilson; Dublin [1960].

SWIFT'S CLASSICAL RHETORIC, by C. A. Beaumont; Athens, Georgia (1961).

THE CURSE OF PARTY: Swift's relations with Addison and Steele, by B. A. Goldgar; Lincoln, Nebraska (1961).

JONATHAN SWIFT AND IRELAND, by O.W. Ferguson; Urbana (1962).

SAMUEL BECKETT ET JONATHAN SWIFT Vers une etude comparee, by J. Fletcher; Toulouse (1902).

CADENUS: A Reassessment . . . of the relationship between Swift, Stella and Vanessa, by S. Le Brocquy; Dublin (1962).

JONATHAN SWIFT: De Engelse Voltaire, by J. L. Snethlage; The Hague (1962).

JONATHAN SWIFT, by N. S. Subramanyam; Allahabad (1962).

SWIFT: The Man, his Works and the Age, by I. Ehrenpreis, Vol 1, MR SWIFT AND HIS CONTEMPORARIES (1962).

REASON AND IMAGINATION, ed. J. A. Mazzeo (1962) — contains an essay by R. S. Crane on Book IV of Gulliver's Travels.

SWIFT AND THB SATIRIST S. ART, by E. W. Rosenheim (1963).

JONATHAN SWIFT, by H. Davis; New York (1964) — contains essays on Swift's Satire and other studies.

« START » « Swift » « Biographies » « Library »