The More etc.

The with a single comparative always indicates that a reason is to be given, and must not be followed, like a plain comparative, by than.

He is the more willing to sanction Smith's appointment because he knows him well.

If we want to construct such a sentence with a than, we must omit the the, e.g.:

He is more willing to sanction Smith's appointment than he would be if he did not know him well.

The with a pair of comparatives always means "by so much as . . . by that much".

The nearer you get to the one, the further you are likely to find yourself from the other.

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